Asia

Standard Operating Procedures for detecting and reacting to incidents of health risks for and die-offs in Saiga antelopes and other wildlife in Kazakhstan

In 2010 and 2015 mass die-off events have been observed in Saiga antelope of the Ural and Betpak-Dala populations in Kazakhstan. In intervening years, smaller die-offs of hundreds to a few thousands of animals have also been observed. These are the first such reported incidents after the dramatic decline in numbers in the 1990s, which led to the current status of a critically endangered species. Only a few thousand animals were left in 2003. Hunting of Saiga antelopes is forbidden and the species is protected by international conventions.

15 August 2017

Study: Conservation Priorities for Shark and Ray Species included and proposed for inclusion in Annex 1 to the CMS Sharks MOU

The Sharks MOU has defined general objectives for the conservation and management of species and populations listed in Annex 1 of the MOU, which are further detailed in a global Conservation Plan for migratory Sharks (Annex 3 to the MOU).
18 October 2015

Illegal Take and Trade of Marine Turtles in the IOSEA Region

Illegal take of marine turtles can assume various forms, from poaching of animals and eggs on nesting beaches to illegal take of animals at sea.   Typically, green and leatherback turtles are hunted for their meat; the hawksbill turtle is hunted for its carapace as the raw material for craftwork; while the eggs of loggerhead and olive ridley turtles are considered a delicacy.  Turtle meat consumption reportedly occurs in 75% of IOSEA Signatory States, while trade in shell products seems to be predominant in East Asian countries.  Whereas numerous investigations in this regard have been unde

18 January 2018

Assessment of the conservation status of the leatherback turtle in the Indian Ocean and South-East Asia

For ease of comparison, the following text is structured using the same headings of the 7-page synthesis section of the 2006 Assessment of the conservation status of the leatherback turtle in the Indian Ocean and South-East Asia, compiled by Hamann et al. , which has been reproduced in  Appendix 1. Blue-coloured blocks interspersed throughout the document contain text extracted verbatim from the original report, reflecting the situation as it was known in 2006. All of the
other text in this document represents more recent information that has been compiled for this update.

12 September 2017