Indian Ocean

Vulnerability of Marine Turtles to Climate Change

Marine turtles are generally viewed as vulnerable to climate change because of the role that temperature plays in the sex determination of embryos, their long
life history, long age-to-maturity and their highly migratory nature. Impacts of different consequences of climate change, such as temperature and sea level rise, extreme weather events etc. in combination with anthropogenic pressures are discussed in this book chapter.

10 May 2019

Seychelles president issues underwater plea to protect oceans

Danny Faure gives speech from submersible 120 metres below surface of Indian Ocean

14 April 2019

Regional Workshop for MTCF-funded projects held in Cambodia

Bonn/Kep, December 2019 - A regional training workshop was organized in Kep, Cambodia (29 October – 2 November 2018) for projects funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Marine Turtle Conservation Fund in Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, and Cambodia.

21 March 2019

The fight against illegal trade in marine turtles needs a global approach and local communities

Bonn, 7 March 2019 - the global ban on the international trade of marine turtles and their products under Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species

07 March 2019

Good news for biodiversity enthusiasts: Olive Ridley turtles arrive at Odisha’s Gahirmatha beach

The mass nesting, a phenomenon known as arribada (a Spanish term), began Tuesday night. An estimated 92,053 female turtles were spotted digging pits with flippers to lay eggs.

01 March 2019

Proposed bill seeks to ensure more protected areas in Seychelles

A new bill to replace the National Parks and Nature Conservancy Act is being proposed in Seychelles to ensure more protected areas in the island nation.

15 February 2019

Global Dugong Genetics Project

The Global Dugong Genetics Project aims to examine the phylogeography of the dugong based on historical samples from throughout the dugong’s range. It will update conservation and management actions through mapping the distribution of discrete dugong populations; identifying historical and potential migratory routes; and highlighting small populations as a priority for conservation. The Project was a collaboration between James Cook University and Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University.

16 July 2018

GEF Dugong and Seagrass Conservation Project

The GEF-5 Project represents a major international collaboration. It is unique in being the first coordinated approach to enhance the effectiveness of conservation of dugongs and their seagrass ecosystems through community-based stewardship, incentive-based conservation, removal of knowledge barriers and national and regional mainstreaming activities. The project covers 38 national projects, managed in collaboration with 26 local partners in Indonesia, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mozambique, Sri Lanka, Solomon Islands, Timor-Leste and Vanuatu.

16 July 2018

Searching for Elusive Green Sea Turtles in the Persian Gulf

Scientists are trying to solve riddles about where and how green sea turtles live in the Middle East, one of the world's least-understood turtle populations.

16 June 2018

First Report of Metallic Elements in Loggerhead and Leatherback Turtle Eggs from the Indian Ocean

Bio-monitoring of pollutants in long-lived animals such as sea turtles is an important tool in ecotoxicology. We present the first report on metallic elements in sea turtle eggs from the Indian Ocean. Eggs of the leatherback and loggerhead turtle that breed on the Indian Ocean coast of South Africa were analysed for 30 elements. The eggshells and egg contents of the loggerhead turtle, the smaller of the two species, had higher or significantly higher concentrations than leatherbacks, except for strontium - the reason is unknown.

13 September 2018